Thursday, November 18, 14:00 – 16:00 CET
Many early-career researchers cite getting and dealing with feedback from their
supervisors as one of the most frustrating aspects. You can wait for ages and
when it comes it’s not what you wanted. Feedback is essential to help you make
progress and improve the quality of you outputs. But if you just say “give me
feedback” you are leaving it completely up to chance. So what can you do to
ensure you get the feedback you need?
This webinar, delivered by Hugh Kearns, will look at asking more specific
questions and being clear about the type of feedback you want.
The topics covered include:
  • when to get feedback
  • how to ask
  • getting timely feedback
  • feedback on writing, feedback on performance, on everything
  • written and verbal feedback
  • interpreting feedback
  • dealing with the emotional reaction to feedback
  • how to respond to feedback
  • how do you manage the feedback you didn’t want?

Register for the webinar https://yearnetwork.clickmeeting.com/goodfeedback/register

About the Speaker

Hugh Kearns is recognised internationally as a public speaker, educator and
researcher. He regularly lectures at universities across the world including
lectures at Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Berkeley and Stanford.
His areas of expertise include self-management, positive psychology, work-life
balance, learning and creativity. He draws on over twenty five years of
experience as a leading training and development professional within the
corporate, financial, education and health sectors in Ireland, Scotland, North
America, New Zealand and Australia. He has coached individuals, teams and
executives in a wide range of organisations in the public and private sectors.
Hugh lectures and researches at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. He is
widely recognised for his ability to take the latest research in psychology and
education and apply it to high-performing people and groups. As a co-author with
Maria Gardiner, he has published ten books which are in high demand both in
Australia and internationally.